15 Best Upperbody Workout Exercises That You Can Do Amid Omicron Restrictions | No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout. A great push-up engages virtually all of your major muscle groups, but the hard lifting is done by your chest, shoulders, and arms.

In this week, your upper body receives some much-needed care. You’ll mix various push-up variations for the ultimate no-equipment upper-body exercise in less than 20 minutes.

The instructor includes routines at three different degrees of difficulty, so whether you’re doing a kneeling push-up or a plyometric push-up, this routine can be tailored to your needs.

Because there is no warmup included, we recommend taking a fast dynamic warmup to get your muscles ready. You’ll only need a mat and some room, so get comfortable and press play.

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15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout
15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

Unless otherwise specified, perform 8–10 reps of each exercise in the sequence listed. Between moves, take as little time as possible to rest.

We’ll give you the directions for the moderate-difficulty version by default, along with the options to make it easier or harder, so you may tailor the workout to your skill level.

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You don’t have to stay on one difficulty level for the entire set; if you’re doing moderate difficulty and don’t believe you’ll be able to complete all 10 reps, switch to your knees halfway through. Step it up a notch if you feel like you’re coasting.

Remember to maintain a straight back throughout all of these movements.

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15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

 One-armed push-up variation (both sides)

15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

One-armed push-ups are a well-known show-off technique and a difficult place to begin.

  1. Begin on your knees, with your hands directly in line with your shoulders on the mat. Raise your feet and cross them, keeping your knees on the mat.
  2. One hand should be raised and placed behind your back. Your other hand should still be on the mat, and your arm should be slightly bent.
  3. Slowly lower yourself until your face is almost touching the mat. Then push yourself back up.
  4. As you near the top of the movement, try to be explosive.
  5. With each arm, perform 5–10 reps.

The easier variant involves doing the same thing but bringing your knees closer to your wrists.

The harder version: Perform the same actions as the easier version, but begin in a full push-up posture with your toes on the floor and legs straight. For support, make sure your legs are broader than the mat and your arm is more central on the mat.

Push-up

15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout
15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

Because nothing beats a classic. There are only two options here: a normal push-up from a high plank posture and a knee-based variation.

We’re not going to tell you how to do a flawless push-up step by step. Instead, have a look at this guide, which explains how to complete a perfect push-up for maximum benefit.

Kneeling archer push-up

Consider the kneeling archer to be a buffing dab.

  • Place your hands on either side of the mat in a kneeling push-up stance.
  • Lean onto your left arm, pressing into the mat with your right arm straight. Keep an eye out for stability along your right arm.
  • Return to a kneeling push-up stance, then lean onto your right arm while looking down the length of your left arm. One rep equals leaning onto both sides.

However, push-ups aren’t the only option; there are a variety of other exercises that target the same muscle regions.

Diamond press-up

This is more difficult than a typical push-up, but isn’t that the point? This version will challenge your mid chest and triceps more than a conventional push-up.

It’s a challenge.

  • On the mat, make a diamond shape with your thumbs and fingers (as demonstrated in the video).
  • Kneel down and perform a push-up.
  • Reduce your body weight to the diamond shape of your hands.
  • Raise yourself back up.

The easier variant involves doing the same thing but bringing your knees closer to your wrists.

The harder version: Perform the same motions as the easy version, but begin in a full push-up posture with your toes on the floor and legs straight. Your feet should be in alignment with the rest of your body.

Hindu push-up

15 Best No-Equipment Upperbody Omicron Lockdown Workout

This one sculpts the top of your chest and doesn’t appear too dissimilar to a yoga stance.

  1. Begin with your toes on the floor, hands shoulder-width apart, and your butt as high as it will go, producing an upside-down V with your body. (Think Down Dog, Yogis.)
  2. Lower yourself by bending your elbows and dipping your nose in front of your thumbs.
  3. Lower your hips to the mat and move your head forward, keeping it low to the mat and parallel.
  4. Return your head to the starting position, keeping your hips close to the mat. Ensure that the movement is smooth and flowing.
  5. Carefully return to the starting place.

Start on your knees instead of your toes for a simpler version.

Dragon walk

We’re quite sure dragons can fly, but they’re also known for their short arms, so…

  1. While maintaining your legs straight, stand at the rear of the mat, bending forward so your fingertips touch the surface.
  2. Push yourself up into a push-up stance by walking your hands forward.
  3. Step forward with your feet to meet hands, keeping your butt in the air.
  4. For the following rep, stand up straight and turn around.

The easier version: Keep your knees bent on the first step if you have less-flexible hamstrings. Then, instead of stepping forward with your feet, walk backward with your hands.

Bodyweight triceps extension

This practice involves transitioning between high and low plank positions, challenging your triceps to their limit.

  1. Begin in a high plank position with your back straight and your palms on the mat.
  2. Bring your left elbow to the mat, then your right, to form a low plank.
  3. In the same order, return to a high plank (left elbow first, then right).
  4. Rep, but this time begin by lowering your right elbow.

The easier version is to do it on your knees rather than your toes.

The more difficult version is to simultaneously lower and lift both elbows (sheesh).

Plank side walk

Make yourself a crab with hencher arms. (It’ll hurt, but your abs and shoulders will appreciate it.)

  1. Start with your feet firmly together and your toes placed against the floor in a high plank position.
  2. Move your left arm and leg sideways (approximately a body width) at the same moment, maintaining them both straight and lifting them off the ground. Maintain a consistent height for your butt.
  3. Finish on the high plank by bringing your right arm and leg back to meet your left arm and leg in their new position.
  4. Rep for the entire length of the mat. Voila! You have one rep left.

Drop your knees for support when you’re finished.

Half push-up hold (15 seconds)

Do you know how you really want to get over that awkward halfway point in a push-up when you’re using the most energy? Yes, you’ll hold yourself there for 20 seconds, but it’ll feel like an eternity.

Enjoy.

  1. Begin in a high plank stance with your feet together.
  2. Start a push-up but stop halfway through, at the point where your muscles are fully engaged.
  3. Hold it for 20 seconds, trying to maintain your butt as level as possible.

The easier version is to do it on your knees rather than your toes.

Pike hold (15 seconds)

This one may not appear to be much, but it will cause a burn in your shoulders.

  1. Start with your toes planted, feet on the mat, butt in the air, and legs as straight as possible, similar to the Hindu push-up.
  2. As you rise onto your toes, tuck your head beneath so you’re gazing straight at your knees.
  3. Hold the position for 20 seconds.

The easy version: Keep your legs bent and concentrate on tucking your head.

Stagger push-up and squat jump

This is when things become a little complicated. Plyometrics and increasing your heart rate are the focus of the next five moves.

  1. Begin with your left hand farther forward than your right in a push-up position.
  2. In this posture, do one push-up, then switch hands, bringing the right hand forward and the left hand back.
  3. Push yourself to do another push-up.
  4. As in a burpee, jump your feet forward toward your knees. Knees should be in line with elbows.
  5. Launch yourself vertically into a jump from this squatting stance.
  6. That counts as one rep. Start with your right hand further forward for the next rep.

Do the staggered push-up steps from your knees for an easier version.

Clap push-up

This is where things start to get a little nuclear. This is a great way to work your triceps, shoulders, and chest. It’s simply impossible to do, especially after 11 other workouts.

  • Begin by doing a push-up with your feet close together and your back straight.
  • Start with one push-up to build some momentum, and then…
  • This section will go by quickly, so pay attention: With an explosive push, jump to your feet, then clap swiftly before placing your hands down to “catch” yourself.
  • Use your momentum to push yourself back up in the middle of the grab.

Do the reps from your knees if you want to make it easier (to be honest, though, this is very difficult whichever way you spin it).

Half push-up to full push-up

The concept is straightforward, but the implementation is complex.

When you do two push-ups, but only go halfway down on one of them, you have completed a rep. It takes a lot more control to switch between the two.

Do the reps from your knees for an easier variant.

Circular archer push-up

The workout is becoming beastly at this point. You’re so close to the finish line — but it’s burning like hell right now.

This is essentially a kneeling archer with a kick in the pants.

  1. Begin with hands on either side of the mat, feet raised and close together, and back straight in a kneeling push-up stance.
  2. Lean onto your left arm, pressing into the mat with your right arm straight. Keep an eye out for stability along your right arm.
  3. Push up on your left side from this position, then return to a kneeling push-up position.
  4. Lean into your right arm and glance down your left arm.
  5. In the same way, push up on the right side.
  6. One rep equals leaning onto both sides.

Move your knees closer to your wrists for a simpler version.

Start in full push-up posture for the more difficult variant.

Uneven push-up

Now comes the final stumbling block – we know you’ll be able to overcome it (pun intended). Do you recall the staggering push-ups we did earlier? This is the same as the previous one, except you swap after 10 instead of alternating.

  1. Begin with a full or kneeling push-up.
  2. Do 10 push-ups with arms on either side of the mat, with the left hand further forward than the right.
  3. Do 10 more times with your hands switched around, moving your right hand further front.
  4. Remove yourself from the mat, summon all of your power, and pat yourself on the back – you’ve done it!

Takeaway

If you’re always putting off working out because of “time restrictions,” think again: this is only 20 minutes of pure exertion. That’s not even a full “Friends” episode.

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